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The Association for Vertical Farming

Q&A: Inside Japan’s Largest Indoor Farm

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An abandoned Sony factory in Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, has been transformed into what could very well be the farm of the future.

Shigeharu Shimamura, a plant physiologist and CEO of Mirai, has constructed the world’s largest indoor farm—25,000 square feet of futuristic garden beds nurtured by 17,500 LED lights in a bacteria-free, pesticide-free environment. The result? About 10,000 heads of fresh lettuce harvested each day.

The unique “plant factory” is so efficient that it cuts food waste from the 30 to 40 percent typically seen for lettuce grown outdoors to less than 3 percent for their coreless lettuce.

National Geographic spoke with Shimamura recently about the innovative food factory and indoor farms as a potential solution to the global food crisis.

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There’s certainly enough available land to double our food assets within the city, but a lot more food can be produced in places that people might be overlooking
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Said by Mark Johnson, an ecohydrology professor at the University of B. C. is leading a project to understand how much food could be produced in Vancouver and what the water footprint would be.

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This sleek soil sensor could change the way we garden and farm forever. Via wired magazine

There are plenty of ways to kill a plant without trying. Trust me. But even hardcore gardeners have a hard time knowing what’s really happening underground. Jason Aramburu created Edyn, a Wi-Fi connected gardening system, with the goal of doing for gardens what wearables have done for our bodies.

SOURCE: http://philips.to/1sz6Zkm

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@grove_labs Calibrating their sensor node technologies for #hydroponic #greenhouses

@grove_labs Calibrating their sensor node technologies for #hydroponic #greenhouses

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K11 shopping mall in #Japan 

#agritecture

K11 shopping mall in #Japan

#agritecture

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Components of a #hydroponic system by Dr. Gene Giacomelli 
#uofa #indoorfarming #education #basics #food #water #energy #aeration #plantscience

Components of a #hydroponic system by Dr. Gene Giacomelli
#uofa #indoorfarming #education #basics #food #water #energy #aeration #plantscience

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thecreativesense:

Microgrowing Kit - InFarm

Another brilliant solution for urban farming, the Microgrowing Kit from InFarm is an origami-inspired form made from a transparent waterproof material and helps grow microgreens in any environment. Ten to fourteen days after planting the seeds within the kit, the greens are ready to eat without the need to water even once… and you can watch the growing process from start to finish. The best part? You can use the kit again and again as often as you like. 

See more at: InFarm

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93% of food consumed in Singapore is imported; only 2% of its land is arable. Designboom shows a loopy scheme from Foward Thinking Architecture, part of Spanish architects JAPA

The looping constructs will allow maximum amounts of sunlight to grow crops such as spinach, lettuce, broccoli, and cabbage year-round. By shaping them in a vertical as opposed to horizontal fashion, regular activities that occur along the shorelines remain uninterrupted and are actually enhanced by visuals of the individually exposed layers that house hydroponic and aquaponic instruments. In addition, rotating racks on each floor improve the mechanisms while adding to the skyline of Singapore.

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Media ReleaseCity Council Recognizes USDA for Work to “Green” Albany
ALBANY, CA, USA - July 21, 2014 – The Albany City Council will publicly recognize the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Western Regional Research Center for its work to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at a Council meeting on July 21st. The USDA recently completed a lighting retrofit of their greenhouses that will conserve nearly 440,000 kWh per year or the equivalent of 105 metric tons of carbon emissions. It is estimated that this project will lead to a one percent reduction in citywide commercial electricity usage.
LumiGrow, Inc. provided LED greenhouse luminaires that reduce light pollution and reduce energy usage by 40 -70%. Unlike conventional greenhouse lights, LumiGrow LED light fixtures emit a targeted red and blue light mix required for photosynthesis. USDA scientists have already noted improved crop yields with the new lights. The luminaires are manufactured in Alameda County, California.

Chris Carter, an administrator in the office of Western Regional Research Center Director Howard Zhang, said “Our scientists conducted tests and found favorable results as to energy savings. They came up with an estimate of $200,000 yearly savings on the electric bill,” Carter said. The tests also indicated favorable results as to “growth time production and water use,” Carter said. The center got higher yields on plants including winter wheat during the experiments, he said.

Media Release
City Council Recognizes USDA for Work to “Green” Albany

ALBANY, CA, USA - July 21, 2014 – The Albany City Council will publicly recognize the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Western Regional Research Center for its work to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at a Council meeting on July 21st. The USDA recently completed a lighting retrofit of their greenhouses that will conserve nearly 440,000 kWh per year or the equivalent of 105 metric tons of carbon emissions. It is estimated that this project will lead to a one percent reduction in citywide commercial electricity usage.

LumiGrow, Inc. provided LED greenhouse luminaires that reduce light pollution and reduce energy usage by 40 -70%. Unlike conventional greenhouse lights, LumiGrow LED light fixtures emit a targeted red and blue light mix required for photosynthesis. USDA scientists have already noted improved crop yields with the new lights. The luminaires are manufactured in Alameda County, California.

Chris Carter, an administrator in the office of Western Regional Research Center Director Howard Zhang, said “Our scientists conducted tests and found favorable results as to energy savings. They came up with an estimate of $200,000 yearly savings on the electric bill,” Carter said. The tests also indicated favorable results as to “growth time production and water use,” Carter said. The center got higher yields on plants including winter wheat during the experiments, he said.

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