Buildings that grow food

Agritecture is the combination of architecture and agriculture. We gather developing innovations, businesses, and projects that employ Agritecture and feature them here.

macedon-ranges-aquaponics:

So the Winter greens are coming along really well.

The Kale is amazing, we began harvesting that for dinner last week, and we were really happy, it was a new one for us and definitely one to keep from now on!

Brussel Sprouts and Snow Peas took very well as did the Silver beet and cabbages. The Broccoli and cauliflowers also took with no issues at all. The Rhubarb was the worry really, it dropped all of its leaves and we had thought we had lost it (bottom right photo, bottom left of growbed) but it came back within the following week and looks strong. I can not wait to get it into an apple and rhubarb crumble!!

Cabbages are also growing well but again, my two crops that i struggle with Spinach and Rocket JUST WONT GROW for me! very frustrating.

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mixgreen:

downspout garden

mixgreen:

downspout garden

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By 2050, we will need 70% more food (UN FAO). Our population will continue to urbanize. The movement to develop sustainable, local production of food inside of cities offers some hope that we will meet this challenge. What technologies do we need to accomplish this in an increasingly polluted external environment? This documentary examines some of the exciting advances that NASA and the University of Arizona have made with their lunar greenhouse project and some of the current applications in Middle East and elsewhere.

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Question:

Really great job you guys are doing here of fielding requests….. I’ll ask again. 

Has anyone ever successfully designed a solar-powered aeroponic blimp? What about designing a solar-powered hydroponic blimp? If so, can you direct me to their models?

-DJ

—————————-

Hi DJ,

We have never heard of a solar powered aeroponic blimp. Sounds very futuristic and space saving but there are still many obstacles to such an idea. Why dont you sketch one up and we will feature it?

-@agritecture

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Plant Factory / Vertical Farming Markets to Reach $1.97 Billion by 2020

Worldwide vertical farming markets are poised to achieve significant growth as the food supply for the world starts to adopt automated process. Grow lights have become more sophisticated and less expensive to run as solar and wind energy is adopted by greenhouses and plant factories. 
Plant Factory (PF), vertical farming is a closed environment in which plants are grown under lights in shelves stacked one on another. All the elements needed for plant growth are artificially controlled, a process that removes detrimental influences such as pesticides and poor weather conditions. Traditional agriculture lives at the mercy of the elements. A plant factory is run based on science. Science is used to produce plants based on carefully controlled spectrum best for plant growth, to produce plants of a fixed quality, quantity, cost, time to harvest, and tuned to control the sale price.
…
Plant factory market forecast analysis indicates that markets at $403 million in 2013 are anticipated to reach $1.97 billion by 2020. Growth is a result of the unmitigated march of automated process driven by the semiconductor industry, by microprocessors, and more directly by the need for food that is uncontaminated.
The ability to use solar energy to grow food using LED lights is a compelling new way to produce food. Using plant factory technology the containers can be put in homes and restaurants, apartments and greenhouses to grow food more efficiently and that is not contaminated with pesticides or other things that should not be on food. The ability to grow food in layers, 24 x 7 represents a major shift in the way food is provided to people. It means fresh food can be available year around at home and anyplace a person is. 
SOURCE: MARKETRESEARCHREPORTS.COM

Plant Factory / Vertical Farming Markets to Reach $1.97 Billion by 2020

Worldwide vertical farming markets are poised to achieve significant growth as the food supply for the world starts to adopt automated process. Grow lights have become more sophisticated and less expensive to run as solar and wind energy is adopted by greenhouses and plant factories. 

Plant Factory (PF), vertical farming is a closed environment in which plants are grown under lights in shelves stacked one on another. All the elements needed for plant growth are artificially controlled, a process that removes detrimental influences such as pesticides and poor weather conditions. Traditional agriculture lives at the mercy of the elements. A plant factory is run based on science. Science is used to produce plants based on carefully controlled spectrum best for plant growth, to produce plants of a fixed quality, quantity, cost, time to harvest, and tuned to control the sale price.

Plant factory market forecast analysis indicates that markets at $403 million in 2013 are anticipated to reach $1.97 billion by 2020. Growth is a result of the unmitigated march of automated process driven by the semiconductor industry, by microprocessors, and more directly by the need for food that is uncontaminated.

The ability to use solar energy to grow food using LED lights is a compelling new way to produce food. Using plant factory technology the containers can be put in homes and restaurants, apartments and greenhouses to grow food more efficiently and that is not contaminated with pesticides or other things that should not be on food. The ability to grow food in layers, 24 x 7 represents a major shift in the way food is provided to people. It means fresh food can be available year around at home and anyplace a person is.

SOURCE: MARKETRESEARCHREPORTS.COM

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New Kids on the Block: Edenworks wants to disrupt the failing food system

Edenworks is developing the future of food infrastructure. We design, build, and operate fully automated aquaponic farms on urban rooftops, then sell our organic, sustainable, locally grown seafood and produce directly to restaurants and other foodservice businesses. Our goal is to disrupt the factory farm system through a resource efficient and scalable solution for local food growing and sourcing. By targeting the supply side of food, Edenworks can seamlessly change the way we all eat. 
http://edenworks.org/

New Kids on the Block: Edenworks wants to disrupt the failing food system

Edenworks is developing the future of food infrastructure. We design, build, and operate fully automated aquaponic farms on urban rooftops, then sell our organic, sustainable, locally grown seafood and produce directly to restaurants and other foodservice businesses. Our goal is to disrupt the factory farm system through a resource efficient and scalable solution for local food growing and sourcing. By targeting the supply side of food, Edenworks can seamlessly change the way we all eat

http://edenworks.org/

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organicandurban:

Via: Grow Food Not Lawns
Innovative homemade hydroponics system.

organicandurban:

Via: Grow Food Not Lawns

Innovative homemade hydroponics system.

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thisbigcity:

Growing Power Urban Farm 
Fact Source | Image Source

thisbigcity:

Growing Power Urban Farm

Fact Source | Image Source

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Freedom Cove, BC 
Boatanic, Amsterdam Boatanic, Amsterdam Balmori Associates, NYC

Three Uber Cool Floating Urban Agriculture Ideas:

See image captions:

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Vertical Farming: Towering Vision, Uncertain Future


Farmers are making inroads supplying local food to hungry city foodies, but many producers are trying to grow more food in urban centers. City real estate is at a premium, so some producers are finding more space by using what’s called “vertical farming,” and going up rather than spreading out.
Growers across the country are heading indoors, using greenhouses and hydroponics – growing plants in a water and nutrient solution instead of soil and using lamps to replace sunlight. Vertical farming takes that to a new level.
But what exactly is a “vertical farm”? Do an internet search and you’ll get some very different pictures of what that term means. 
Some conceptualized vertical farms are like space-age skyscrapers, while others are simple, boxy structures with racks of artificially lit plants stacked to the ceiling.
The man widely credited with bring the term into the mainstream says it’s simple: any high-tech greenhouse that goes up rather than out.
 “Instead of spreading out,” said Columbia University ecologist and professor emeritus Dr. Dickson Despommier, “take those greenhouses and stack them on top of each other, employing the same technologies – you’ve got yourself a vertical farm.”
Despommier is among the futurists who argue that the booming global urban population will make self-sustaining urban food systems a necessity.
“I can see the urban landscape parasitizing the rural landscape for its resources,” Despommier said, adding that he sees densely populated areas in Europe, Korea and Japan benefiting most from his vertical vision.  
But critics of that vision say vertical farming won’t be able to produce the scale of food a growing population will need – at least not without massive amounts of energy and other inputs.
“Vertical farming is kind of a vision of factory farming of plants,” said Stan Cox of The Land Institute in Kansas, a group that advocates for environmental and sustainable agriculture issues. “Just like with animals, it requires much higher inputs of energy, much more stress on the plant, and generally is doing things the hard way.”
In Chicago, entrepreneur John Edel is working hard to show skeptics that garbage itself can fuel vertical farming, making it more sustainable. With a grant from the State of Illinois, he’s installing a giant anaerobic digester that will convert truckloads of food waste into biogas, burned onsite to keep the lights on.
“We’re in the thick of construction now,” Edel said. “I think by the end of this year everything will be operational and we’ll be well beyond net-zero.”
Edel’s vertical farm, The Plant Chicago, looks different than the architectural renderings of towering green skyscrapers you’ll find on the web.
In 2010, Edel bought a four-story, 94,000 square foot warehouse in a bankruptcy sale. The hulking red brick facility, built in the 1920s next to Chicago’s Union Stockyards, used to process bacon and ham. Now it is home to 11 small-scale food businesses, from bakers to kombucha brewers to aquaponic farms growing greens and fish for area restaurants.
The mission?
“To create those jobs and to grow the food as locally as possible,” Edel said. “In order to reduce the pollution associated with its transport, the costs associated with its transport, and to keep those dollars here, close to home.” 
Edel’s operation, which he calls a “social enterprise”, is trying to create a replicable model of closed-loop, energy-independent urban food production. He’s less concerned about competing for space in a grocery store produce aisle than he is about raising awareness. 
But FarmedHere, a commercial vertical farm in Chicago, sells basil and other greens to upscale grocery chains throughout the city and suburbs. And Green Spirit Farms recently inked a deal to expand its vertical farming operation to an empty factory near Scranton, Pa.  At 300,000 square feet, it would become the largest in the nation. 
The move to grow more food indoors has also caught on for pharmaceuticals. The Defense Department funded a vertical farm in Texas that grows plants for vaccines and cancer-fighting drugs.
Still, most vertical farming operations today, even with increased efficiency due to LED lighting, have a hefty electric bill and carbon footprint.
Farms aren’t all white picket fences and red barns anymore. And in the future, they might be in skyscrapers.
SOURCE

Vertical Farming: Towering Vision, Uncertain Future

Farmers are making inroads supplying local food to hungry city foodies, but many producers are trying to grow more food in urban centers. City real estate is at a premium, so some producers are finding more space by using what’s called “vertical farming,” and going up rather than spreading out.

Growers across the country are heading indoors, using greenhouses and hydroponics – growing plants in a water and nutrient solution instead of soil and using lamps to replace sunlight. Vertical farming takes that to a new level.

But what exactly is a “vertical farm”? Do an internet search and you’ll get some very different pictures of what that term means. 

Some conceptualized vertical farms are like space-age skyscrapers, while others are simple, boxy structures with racks of artificially lit plants stacked to the ceiling.

The man widely credited with bring the term into the mainstream says it’s simple: any high-tech greenhouse that goes up rather than out.

 “Instead of spreading out,” said Columbia University ecologist and professor emeritus Dr. Dickson Despommier, “take those greenhouses and stack them on top of each other, employing the same technologies – you’ve got yourself a vertical farm.”

Despommier is among the futurists who argue that the booming global urban population will make self-sustaining urban food systems a necessity.

“I can see the urban landscape parasitizing the rural landscape for its resources,” Despommier said, adding that he sees densely populated areas in EuropeKorea and Japan benefiting most from his vertical vision.  

But critics of that vision say vertical farming won’t be able to produce the scale of food a growing population will need – at least not without massive amounts of energy and other inputs.

“Vertical farming is kind of a vision of factory farming of plants,” said Stan Cox of The Land Institute in Kansas, a group that advocates for environmental and sustainable agriculture issues. “Just like with animals, it requires much higher inputs of energy, much more stress on the plant, and generally is doing things the hard way.”

In Chicago, entrepreneur John Edel is working hard to show skeptics that garbage itself can fuel vertical farming, making it more sustainable. With a grant from the State of Illinois, he’s installing a giant anaerobic digester that will convert truckloads of food waste into biogas, burned onsite to keep the lights on.

“We’re in the thick of construction now,” Edel said. “I think by the end of this year everything will be operational and we’ll be well beyond net-zero.”

Edel’s vertical farm, The Plant Chicago, looks different than the architectural renderings of towering green skyscrapers you’ll find on the web.

In 2010, Edel bought a four-story, 94,000 square foot warehouse in a bankruptcy sale. The hulking red brick facility, built in the 1920s next to Chicago’s Union Stockyards, used to process bacon and ham. Now it is home to 11 small-scale food businesses, from bakers to kombucha brewers to aquaponic farms growing greens and fish for area restaurants.

The mission?

“To create those jobs and to grow the food as locally as possible,” Edel said. “In order to reduce the pollution associated with its transport, the costs associated with its transport, and to keep those dollars here, close to home.” 

Edel’s operation, which he calls a “social enterprise”, is trying to create a replicable model of closed-loop, energy-independent urban food production. He’s less concerned about competing for space in a grocery store produce aisle than he is about raising awareness. 

But FarmedHere, a commercial vertical farm in Chicago, sells basil and other greens to upscale grocery chains throughout the city and suburbs. And Green Spirit Farms recently inked a deal to expand its vertical farming operation to an empty factory near Scranton, Pa.  At 300,000 square feet, it would become the largest in the nation. 

The move to grow more food indoors has also caught on for pharmaceuticals. The Defense Department funded a vertical farm in Texas that grows plants for vaccines and cancer-fighting drugs.

Still, most vertical farming operations today, even with increased efficiency due to LED lighting, have a hefty electric bill and carbon footprint.

Farms aren’t all white picket fences and red barns anymore. And in the future, they might be in skyscrapers.

SOURCE

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interior-design-home:

Space Saving Rain Gutter Backyard Garden
DIY guide: http://www.farmxchange.org/zigg-design-specs/

interior-design-home:

Space Saving Rain Gutter Backyard Garden

DIY guide: http://www.farmxchange.org/zigg-design-specs/

Comments